Worms


Big soft plastic worms work great for targeting bigger largemouth bass.  In some lakes, you may not get very many bites with the 10″ and 12″ worms, but the bites you do get will be quality bites.  If you are fishing lakes that have big bass potential, you may want to try using a bigger worm, especially during the summer time.

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Curly Tail Worms are some of the most common soft plastics that are used for largemouth bass.  So many of these worms will work on a variety of different rigs to catch tons of bass.  Some of the most common rigs are the Texas rig, Florida rig, Carolina rig, shaky head jig, a weightless rig, a split shot rig, a drop shot rig, scrounger jighead or even a swimbait hook.  A slow stop and go retrieve works best with curly tail worms, but you can also have some success with a slow and steady swimming retrieve.

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Finesse worms are very popular for targeting largemouth bass, especially in clear water.  Most anglers will use finesse worms with light line on a drop shot rig and they will target bass in deeper water.  Don’t rule out shallow water cover, darker water or using heavier line when drop-shotting finesse worms.  These worms can be very effective in a variety of situations.

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Floating worms are unique since they float up off the bottom.  Most anglers fish these baits on a Carolina rig or drop shot rig and they’re probably the best 2 rigs to fish these baits, but they also look good on a variety of others as well.  Shaky head jigs, the Texas rig, Florida rig and even swimbait hooks make these soft plastic baits look good.  Fish these baits slowly and let the floating soft plastic baits do their magic.  As the baits lift off the bottom and float up, they are much more visible and at times, much more appealing to a hungry largemouth bass.

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Fork Tail Worms work well for largemouth bass.  The problem is finding fork tail worms on the market.  More manufacturers need to make them.


Paddle Tail Worms can be used with a variety of different rigs for targeting largemouth bass.  There are many different paddle tail worms on the market that come in a variety of sizes.  You can fish them shallow, deep, in open water, around shallow water cover and any other area that you may find a largemouth bass.  Paddle tail worms should definitely be in your tackle box if you like to fish with soft plastics for largemouth bass.

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Ring worms are one of the better action baits you can use for largemouth bass.  Whether you drop shot them or swim them, they are an excellent bait.  Because most ring worms are smaller finesse-style baits, don’t expect to catch a bunch of big bass on these baits.  They are more of an action bait.  If more manufacturers would make larger ring worms, they could easily become a big largemouth bass bait, but at this time, it’s definitely an action bait.

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Swimming Worms are becoming more popular with some of the newer types of swim worms to emerge on the market.  These worms work great on a variety of rigs, but the weighted swimbait hook, shaky head jig or Florida rig are probably the best ways to rig these worms.  You can fish around all types of shallow cover, along the drop-offs in deeper water or just in open water for suspended bass.

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Wacky worms may be the most popular types of worms to fish weightless.  The wacky style rig has swept the country and bass anglers can’t get enough of this technique.  You can use some different rigs when fishing wacky worms, but these worms were made to be fished weightless.

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