Flounder Fishing

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flounderFlounder, also called fluke, are some of the funnier-looking fish in the ocean.  They have both eyes on the same  side of its body and they are extremely flat.  They may look funny, but they taste great.  Flounder are most commonly found from Maine to the Carolinas, but you can catch them throughout the Gulf of Mexico as well.

line-3Photo Credit:  Des Colhoun |  This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.
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Habitat

Summer Flounder inhabit coastal and estuarine waters during the spring, summer and fall months, then they move to offshore waters during the winter.  Most summer flounder are between 2 – 4 pounds, although 15 – 20 pound fish are not uncommon.  Winter Flounder spend the summer offshore in deeper waters, then they come back into the shallow coastal estuaries, rivers and bays during the winter.

How to Catch Flounder

A single hook bottom rig is really all you need to catch flounder.  They are bottom feeders so a heavy sinker is a must for fishing deeper water.  In shallower water, you can get away with lighter weights, but you should still keep your baits on or near the bottom for the best results.  Many flounder are caught offshore anywhere from 20 to 60 feet of water, but most anglers target flounder inshore in the bays, lagoons, passes, tidal creeks, around piers, bridges, docks and even on the beaches.  Live baits are the way to go if you want to consistently put flounder in the boat.  Bull minnows, pinfish, finger mullet and live shrimp work well for flounder.

Eating Flounder

Flounder are some of the finest tasting fish in the sea.  They are easy to fillet and the meat holds its flavor for a long time while frozen.

Flounder Fishing Basics

Fishing Lures for Flounder

Fishing Rigs for Flounder

Below are some of the popular fishing rigs for catching flounder with artificial lures or live bait.

Live Baits for Flounder

Below are some of the best live baits that are used for catching Flounder.

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