Wood


In most rivers and reservoirs, timber and brush may be the only shallow water cover. Weeds are almost nonexistent so walleye and sauger will be relating to wood and rock.  If you can find a rocky shoreline that also has some type of timber or brush, there is a good chance that there will be some walleye near the wood.  Flooded trees, logs and stumps are all good places to find fish.

If you are looking to find the largest concentrations of walleye and sauger, look for timber and brush that is close to deeper water.  Timber and brush near a deep creek channel will hold more fish than along a shallow flat.  Deep-sloping shorelines with trees and stumps will hold more fish than trees on a shallow sandbar.  As a general rule, target the brush areas in the spring during high water.  Walleye and sauger will move into these areas to spawn.  Timber near deeper water will hold fish throughout the entire year.

Most anglers that fish timber and brush will use cone-sinker rigs with weedless hooks, brush guard jigs, or smaller jigs with fine-wire hooks that will bend and release from the wood if you pull it hard enough.  Anglers will also use spinner rigs, crankbaits, jigging spoons and slip bobber rigs.